The Sedona Conference and Its Impact on E-Discovery

Publication of M. Berman, et al., eds., ELECTRONICALLY STORED INFORMATION IN THE MARYLAND COURTS (2020)
May 12, 2020
Rule 26(g) Sanctions for Failure to Supervise Document Collection and Review
November 27, 2020

Kenneth J. Withers of the Sedona Conference has posted a chapter from M. Berman, et al., eds., “Electronic Discovery in Maryland Courts” (MSBA 2020), on the Sedona Conference’s web site.  The Sedona Conference has had, and continues to have, a pivotal role in e-discovery.  Sedona papers were cited by the Court of Appeals of Maryland in drafting Maryland’s January 2008 ESI Rules.  Kenneth’s chapter describes in detail the thought process behind the influential Sedona Principles and other papers.

Kenneth describes the unique methodology, designed by Richard G. Braman (1953 – 2014), used to prepare Sedona’s influential works.  He also describes how the seminal “Cooperation Proclamation” came to be.

The Sedona Conference’s publications are available at no charge from the publications page of its web site.

Sedona is a small city in the high desert of Arizona, spread among the rugged canyons and mesas of the Oak Creek Valley, about thirty miles south of Flagstaff. It is home to a vibrant community of cowboy artists, retirees, and a few hardy descendants of the original homesteaders who have coaxed apples and wine grapes from the dry, rocky soil for a century and a half.